Story by Montreal correspondent Trung Nguyen
Pictures provided by Ibuku

C2 Montreal, a truly unique event that brings Creativity and Commerce together, is just a few days away. This year again, C2 has an impressive line-up of world-renowned speakers that share a common goal: “to inspire creative solutions for commercial problems.” Among them are Suroosh Alvi (Vice Media), P.K. Subban (NHL player and Philanthropist), Dr. David Suzuki (David Suzuki Foundation) and Chad Dickerson (Etsy).

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C2 Montreal – Photo by Jimmy Hamelin

One speaker in particular caught our attention: Elora Hardy, Founder and Creative Director at Ibuku, a team of designers, architects and engineers that is exploring ground-breaking ways of using bamboo to build homes, hotels, schools and event spaces in Bali, Indonesia.

—> Elora Hardy will speak at C2 on May 24th.

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Bambu Indah project

Bambu Indah project

Bambu Indah project

Elora Hardy and her team of talented Indonesian designers and architects have built over fifty unique bamboo structures in Bali. Nine of these buildings now make up Green Village, a community of luxurious private homes neighbouring Green School, a project initiated by her father in 2007.

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River House – Photo by Rio Helmi

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Sharma Springs – Photo by Rio Helmi

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Sharma Springs – Photo by Rio Helmi

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Sharma Springs – Photo by Rio Helmi

Ibuku uses bamboo because of its strength, beauty, and flexibility, and also because with its 4-year growth cycle and carbon sequestration capacity it is the most environmentally conscientious building material conceivable. Though bamboo has traditionally been used throughout Asia in short-term structures, new treatment methods have given it a capacity for longer life.

Sharma Springs - Photo by Rio Helmi

Sharma Springs – Photo by Rio Helmi

Sharma Springs - Photo by Rio Helmi

Sharma Springs – Photo by Rio Helmi

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Sharma Springs – Photo by Rio Helmi

“Ibuku’s goal is to provide spaces in which people can live in an authentic relationship with nature. We do this by designing fully functional homes and furniture that are made of natural substances and built in ways that integrate with nature. Ibuku is creating spaces where living in nature is living in style.”

– Elora Hardy

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Sunrise House – Photo by Rio Helmi

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Sunrise House – Photo by Rio Helmi

 

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Sharma Springs – Photo by Rio Helmi

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Sunrise House – Photo by Rio Helmi

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Sunrise House – Photo by Rio Helmi

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Sunrise House – Photo by Rio Helmi

 

Their Design Process Explained

Ibuku’s design process occurs on the land and for the land. The houses are tailored to gently rest on their foundation, carefully set in the earth’s natural contour, so that they have minimal impact on the environment.

Instead of conventional blueprints, Ibuku creates to-scale structural models made of hand-whittled bamboo sticks. These models are replicated in 3D line in computer programs for the engineers to study and confirm that the building adheres to Ibuku’s strict codes. The design process doesn’t end there. Architects and engineers then follow the project in depth through completion to ensure structural integrity and longevity.

We would like to thank Ibuku for sharing their inspiring story with us. To see more, please visit ibuku.com

Elora Hardy will speak at C2 on May 24th.
To find the full C2 schedule, visit : c2montreal.com

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Sharma Springs – Photo by Errol Vaes

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Sharma Springs – Photo by Errol Vaes

Sunrise House - Photo by Rio Helmi

Sunrise House – Photo by Rio Helmi

 

Trung Nguyen
Montreal Correspondent
A teacher, a father, a photographer, Trung is driven by exploring and learning about art, culture, technology and design. His works in photography are fueled by his desire to document not only beautiful craft, but also about the people behind it.